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Microphone's instrument pickup skills and tips

Author:admin   AddTime:2021-07-17

Adjusting the microphone accordingly according to the nature of the musical instrument can record professional sound quality more accurately and clearly. Several common musical instruments are explained below.
To record a grand piano/upright piano grand piano: Place two large heart-shaped diaphragm microphones about 8 to 16 inches (20 to 40 cm) above the strings. One is aimed at the treble area and the other is aimed at the bass area. Position the two microphones approximately 6 inches (15 cm) behind the pedal. As another option, you can also pick up the bass area from the back of the grand piano, so that you can get a fuller bass sound. Upright piano: The method of picking up the sound of an upright piano is the same as the method of picking up the sound of a grand piano. If the front cover is closed, the microphone can be aimed at the inside of the instrument from above. Remove the front cover to get a more airy sound.
Recording the flute: The sound of the flute comes from the mouthpiece and the first opening. Sounds up to 3 kilohertz radiate mainly along the line of sight of the flute player. Method 1: Using two heart-shaped microphones, align the microphone 1 with the player’s mouth from 7 feet (2 meters) away and about 8 feet (2.5 meters) above the ground, and place the microphone 2 on the player’s mouth. The right side is about a 90-degree angle. Method 2: Use only one microphone, and its placement method is the same as that of microphone 1, but it should be placed a little farther.
To record the clarinet: Use a cardioid microphone and aim it at the bottom button. If you want to minimize the noise of the keys, you can place the microphone slightly to the side of the instrument. The sound in the low midrange and midrange (between 800 Hz and 3 kHz) is only emitted from the button area. As the pitch increases (high-mid and high-range), more sound will be emitted from the horn. The frequency (above 5 kilohertz) generated by vigorously playing will only sound from the trumpet and shoot all the way to the ground. Therefore, a reflective floor will make the sound brighter and more brilliant.
To record tenor saxophone/treble saxophone: align a cardioid microphone roughly at the button area in the middle of the instrument. Because the sound of the saxophone comes from its horn and all the buttons that are turned on, the radiation direction will often change. Most of the low frequency is produced through its horn, because at this time almost all the buttons are in the off state. Most of the high frequencies come from near the mouthpiece. We recommend placing the microphone about 20 to 40 inches (0.5 to 1 meter) away from the instrument so that it can pick up its entire sound spectrum without over-emphasizing certain special frequencies.

To record a trumpet/trombone: Use a cardioid microphone and aim it at the edge of the bell mouth from a slightly deviated direction. The sound you pick up depends on the distance between the microphone and the instrument. When picking up a trumpet from a close range of 2 to 12 inches (5 to 30 cm), we recommend playing against one of the sides of the microphone. Certain blowing techniques can create eddy currents on the microphone. The use of a windshield will reduce the resulting noise. The pre-attenuation switch on the microphone must be turned on, because both trumpet and trombone can generate extremely high sound pressure levels as high as 130 decibels.



Recording Acoustic Guitar/Violin/Viola Acoustic Guitar: A good way to pick up the guitar is to place a heart-shaped, large-diaphragm microphone near the sound hole and a small diaphragm near the bridge or under the body microphone. Find the desired sound by adjusting the level ratio of the two microphones. Violin, viola: Be sure to use a high-quality heart-shaped condenser microphone. Make it at a right angle to the soundboard and align the f hole from a height of about 6 to 8 feet (1.8 to 2.5 meters). The method of picking up the viola is the same as the method of picking up the violin, but a little further away.
To record the double bass/cello double bass: align a cardioid microphone at one of the f holes from a distance of about 16 inches (40 cm). If you are recording the double bass in an ensemble with other instruments, use a supercardioid microphone to pick up the sound within a shorter distance to avoid interference from other instruments. Cello: First place a cardioid microphone in the same way that you pick up the sound of a double bass, and then place a more distant microphone. Adjust the level of the close-range microphone to be about 20 decibels lower than the level of the long-range microphone. www.settune.net
To record an electric guitar/electric bass electric guitar: Use a cardioid microphone and aim it at the speaker diaphragm from a slightly deviated direction about 3 to 6 inches (8 to 15 cm). Turn on the pre-attenuation switch on the microphone. And consider using a room microphone. Electric bass: The placement of the microphone is the same as that used when picking up the electric guitar. At the same time, you can also use the line output on the DI box or bass amplifier to add direct signals to the bass track. If you use unbalanced connections (TS connectors and cables), you must ensure that the length of the cable does not exceed 7 feet (2 meters). To avoid hum interference.
Recording a drum kit: Picking up a drum kit requires considerable knowledge and experience. It is a difficult job to get the desired effect. As the smallest microphone setting method, we recommend placing two condenser microphones like settune srm-27 32 to 48 inches (80 to 120 cm) above the drummer’s head. If your budget allows, you can use this pair of overhead microphones only to pick up the cymbals, use an equalizer to cut the frequencies below 1 kHz, and use the following pickups for the rest of the drum components. Sound method: hanging and floor-standing thong drums: place the microphone very close to the edge of the top circle. Snare drum: Place the microphone 1.2 to 2 inches (3 to 5 cm) above the top. You can also consider using another microphone to aim the snare drum from the bottom, but be sure to reverse its polarity. Hi-hat: Use a super heart-shaped small diaphragm microphone and keep it away from the snare drum. Bass drum: Be sure to turn on the pre-attenuation switch on the microphone (the sound pressure level may be as high as 160 decibels). Remove the front drum head and place the microphone in the drum cavity. The farther the microphone is placed from the back, the fuller the sound. Avoid placing the microphone directly at the position where the hammer is hitting the drum head, as this will only pick up the dry beat sound that lacks low frequency.
Recording lead vocals: To pick up a popular and very intimate lead vocal sound, we recommend placing a cardioid microphone 6 to 12 inches (15 to 30 cm) away from the singer and turning on the low-frequency attenuation filter . The sponge-like windshield can effectively suppress the popping sound (such as "p" or "t"). The most appropriate method of noise suppression is to use a separate anti-puff screen.
Recording backing vocals/chorus: Method A: If there is a sufficient number of available tracks, then we recommend recording their respective voices separately. The placement of the microphone is the same as that used when recording the lead vocal. Method B: When picking up multiple singers who use separate microphones at the same time, super-cardioid microphones should be used to prevent mutual interference, especially when the distance between the microphones is close. Method C: When using a single microphone to pick up multiple singers, the directivity of the microphone should be set to a circle (omnidirectional) or a heart shape, and the singers should be arranged into an open semicircle. Around the microphone. If you are picking up the cantata, you should use a separate microphone for each part. You can also consider using an additional stereo microphone. In an ideal acoustic environment, a single stereo microphone or a pair of mono microphones is enough to enable you to record very good sound.

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